E-mail Me! Click Here!
Louisville Music News.net
August 1994 Articles
Cover Story
Darrell Elmore
Features
Paul Turner
Darrell Elmore
Columns
Berk Bryant
Jim Galipeau
Jan Winders
Paul Moffett
Earl Meyers
Keith Clements
Todd Hildreth
Duncan Barlow
Bob Bahr
CD Reviews
Allen Howie
Mark Clark
Allen Howie
Paul Moffett
Kevin Gibson
Bob Bahr
Kevin Gibson
Kevin Gibson
Todd Hildreth
Todd Hildreth
Cary Stemle
John Goodin
Kevin Gibson
Performance Reviews
Jean-Marie Ebel
Beverly Howell
William Brents
Allen Howie
Jean Metcalfe
Allen Howie
Pete Strojny
Allen Howie
Kevin Gibson
Jean-Marie Ebel
Bryan E. Hurst
Jean Metcalfe
Mark Clark
Wally Stewart
Interviews
Bob Bahr
Calendar
News Item
Errata
Photos
Eddie Davis
Jean Metcalfe
LASC
Paul Moffett
Jean Metcalfe
Michael Boehnlein
Blogs
Got Shows?
Send Them To Us
Bookmark Louisville Music News.net with these handy
social bookmarking tools:
del.icio.us digg
StumbleUpon spurl
wists simpy
newsvine blinklist
furl blogmarks
yahoo! myweb smarking
ma.gnolia segnalo
reddit fark
technorati cosmos
Available RSS Feeds
Top Picks - Top Picks
Top Picks - Today's Music
Top Picks - Editor's Blog
Top Picks - Articles
Add Louisville Music News' RSS Feed to Your Yahoo!
Add to My Yahoo!
Contact: contact@louisvillemusicnews.net
Louisville, KY 40207
Copyright 1989-2017
Louisvillemusicnews.net, Louisville Music News, Inc.
All Rights Reserved  


Issue: August 1994

funk in the pocket

Brother Sister (Delicious Vinyl)

The Brand New Heavies

The Brand New Heavies (Simon Bartholomew on guitar, N'Dea Davenport on vocals, Jan Kincaid on drums and keyboards, and Andrew Levy on bass) come across like a leaner, jazzier Sly and the Family Stone. The funk may be trimmed back a little, but the eclectic embrace of styles and the positive push to the lyrics remain.

Take the title song, a jaunty call for self-reliance that glides along on Davenport's sweetly soulful vocals, breezy horn charts and brisk percussion. Or the even more upbeat "Dream On Dreamer," with its embrace-your-dreams message laid over a smart mix of West Coast jazz and Philly soul.

The instrumentals "Ten Ton Take" and "Snake Hips" sound like James Brown's band stretching out and flexing its muscles. "Mind Trip" explores a deliciously relaxed soul groove, while "Fake" is funky party music, with Mike Smith's fat sax lines throwing their weight around and the band's ensemble percussion keeping things moving.

And if radio would surrender its format fetish for even a few days, the burnished melody of "Spend Some Time" would be all over the airwaves, with the luscious swirl of "Back to Love" following close behind.

The Brand New Heavies blend fluid vocals and stippled percussion with sweeping melodies and a sure-footed feel for a groove. If a few of the songs here seem to go on a little too long at first, be patient. Another listen or two will reveal subtle shadings that draw the listener further into the pulsating mix. From that point on, The Brand New Heavies will have you in their pocket. You could do a lot worse.

Bookmark and Share